Pendlebury Press

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We Publish secular titles for three reasons: 1. To draw attention to works that have an underlying Christian message. An example of this is Robert Louis Stevenson’s Kidnapped – Annotated and Illustrated. This book might well be a commentary on the question, Who is my neighbour?  2. To give a helping hand. An example of this is Tape. The authors are undergraduates who asked us to publish their first year project. 3. To help us with revenue. Low volume sales of Christian titles barely cover our overheads.

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Tape: Kevin Boardman and Adam Dunn: a brief guide to innovative uses of sticky tape - make a jacket, bag, greenhouse and shelter, not out of woven cloth, but tape. This will give you the foundations for further innovation using this cheap household item. It's practical and it's fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kidnapped (Robert Louis Stevenson) – Annotated and Illustrated 2017:  This thrilling adventure story might have been written as a commentary on the question, “Who is my neighbour? The central characters are a protestant supporter of the English King George ll and a Jacobite, loyal to the Catholic pretender to the throne, Bonnie Prince Charlie. Their friendship transcends politics and religious belief. Kidnapped was rated number 24 in the 100 best novels of all time by the UK’s Guarding Newspaper, who declared it to be a masterpiece, a thrilling adventure story and gripping history. Stevenson’s electrifying narrative is intertwined with historical events and coloured with Scottish dialect. For those unacquainted with Scottish history and dialect, the book is annotated with 151 notes on history and language. It also contains a glossary of 170 Scottish words and expressions. Do you know what Alan means when he says to David, “Ye have a … clappermaclaw kind of a look to ye, as if ye had stolen the coat from a potato-bogle.” Though some of the Scottish words are easily understood by those whose first language is English, there are many that are not. A chield is not a child; Jock is not a person’s name nor a term for a Scot; a kyte is neither a bird nor something to fly in the wind. These expressions and many more are explained. This powerful novel is deceptive in its simplicity. It can be read and loved for its breath-taking storytelling, action and characterisation, but it also carries a message for the 21st century.

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Deflationsim and Semantic Theories of Truth: Michael K Butler: This book builds on the work of Jeffrey Ketland in demonstrating that semantic definitions of truth for formalised languages, in particular those of Alfred Tarski and Saul Kripke, are richer than their deflationary rivals, in the sense that they enable us to derive results that cannot be derived via deflationary theories. This deductive power of semantic theories of truth suggests that truth is, contrary to the deflationists’ view, a substantive notion that warrants continued philosophical analysis. The author is a Senior Lecturer in Mathematics at the University of Bolton. His academic interests include abstract algebra, in particular group theory, ring theory and Galois theory, the philosophy of science, and the philosophy of logic. He lives in south Manchester.

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Text Box:  Cantona – Ooh Ah  A short story by Geoffrey Howard, The author’s daughter said of this, “Dad, if I didn’t know you better, I’d have thought you had been on drugs.” This slim volume of barely 30 pages has limited appeal. A knowledge of footballers and the Roman Catholic Church helps. It has been termed outrageous, surreal and blasphemous, but Geoffrey Howard said that he had his tongue firmly in his cheek when he wrote it.  The first piece is a surreal fictional work about Eric Cantona. When his second cousin and restaurant owner hears that he is to play in a charity match at Old Trafford, he has a bright idea. How can he use Eric Cantona to boost sales? The solution causes mayhem. The second piece is a script for a ten minute film about a boy who wants to be a footballer. His problem is shared by all children. How can you play ball games without neighbours complaining? His father's solution backfires and gives the reader a smile. This story is written as a script which may not be an easy medium for all readers.